Opinion / Budget

Bad Idea: Moving OCO Back into the Base Budget (While Negotiating a Budget Deal)

The OCO budget has been taken advantage of to skirt defense spending limits and to fund base budget activities that do not actually constitute war funding. However, moving all of OCO’s enduring costs into the base budget for the final two years of the Budget Control Act caps may not be politically expedient for passing a budget agreement for FY 2020 and FY 2021.

Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usairforce/6337728522/
Analysis / Acquisition

Overseas Contingency Operations Contracts After Iraq

This study examines the literature on how contracts are fulfilled for both civilian and defense crisis funds, primarily focusing on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), disaster funds, and Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funds. Utilizing publicly available data, the study provides a methodology for classifying the contracts and analyzes the data based on noncompetitive awards, undefinitized contract actions, and reachback contracts.

U.S. Air National Guard photo/Staff Sgt. Christopher S. Muncy: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usairforce/29396127562/
Analysis / Budget

The Enduring Dilemma of Overseas Contingency Operations Funding

Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding poses challenges for the new administration as they prepare its FY 2018 budget request. OCO funding is intended for war-related activities that cannot be forecasted. However, it has become a convenient loophole for defense spending since it is not restricted by the Budget Control Act (BCA) budget caps. This analysis address the challenges presented by OCO funding and possible options for handling base budget activities in OCO.